Cocktails

Rum

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Rum (disambiguation). Government House rum, manufactured by the Virgin Islands Company distillery in St. Croix, circa 1941
Rum is a distilled alcoholic beverage made from sugarcane byproducts, such as molasses, or directly from sugarcane juice, by a process of fermentation and distillation. The distillate, a clear liquid, is then usually aged in oak barrels.The majority of the world's rum production occurs in the Caribbean and Latin America. Rum is also produced in Scotland, Austria, Spain, Australia, New Zealand, Fiji, the Philippines, India, Reunion Island, Mauritius, South Africa, Taiwan, Thailand, Japan, the United States, and Canada.Rums are produced in various grades. Light rums are commonly used in cocktails, whereas "golden" and "dark" rums were typically consumed straight or neat, on the rocks, or used for cooking, but are now commonly consumed with mixers. Premium rums are also available, made to be consumed either straight or iced.Rum plays a part in the culture of most islands of the West Indies as well as in The Maritimes and Newfoundland. This beverage has famous associations with the Royal Navy (where it was mixed with water or beer to make grog) and piracy (where it was consumed as bumbo). Rum has also served as a popular medium of economic exchange, used to help fund enterprises such as slavery (see Triangular trade), organized crime, and military insurgencies (e.g., the American Revolution and Australia's Rum Rebellion).

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rum

Vodka

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia Vodka (from Russian: водка [ˈvotkə], Polish: wódka [ˈvutka]) is a distilled beverage composed primarily of water and ethanol, sometimes with traces of impurities and flavorings. Traditionally, vodka is made by the distillation of cereal grains or potatoes that have been fermented, though some modern brands use other substances, such as fruits or sugar.Since the 1890s, the standard Polish, Russian, Belarusian, Ukrainian, Estonian, Latvian, Lithuanian and Czech vodkas are 40% alcohol by volume ABV (80 US proof), a percentage that is widely misattributed to Dmitri Mendeleev.[1][2] The European Union has established a minimum of 37.5% ABV for any "European vodka" to be named as such.[3][4] Products sold as "vodka" in the United States must have a minimum alcohol content of 40%.[5] Even with these loose restrictions, most vodka sold contains 40% ABV. For homemade vodkas and distilled beverages referred to as "moonshine", see moonshine by country.Vodka is traditionally drunk neat (not mixed with any water, ice, or other mixer), though it is often served chilled in the vodka beltcountries: Russia, Belarus, Poland, Ukraine, Lithuania, Latvia, Estonia, Sweden, Norway, Finland, and Iceland. It is also commonly used in cocktails and mixed drinks, such as the Vodka martini, Cosmopolitan, Vodka Tonic, Screwdriver, Greyhound, Black or White Russian, Moscow Mule, and Bloody Mary

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Vodka


Gin

 From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia 

Gin is a spirit which derives its predominant flavour from juniper berries (Juniperus communis). From its earliest origins in the Middle Ages, gin has evolved from use in herbal medicine to an object of commerce in the spirits industry. Gin was developed on the basis of the older jenever, and became popular in Great Britain (particularly in London) when William of Orange, leader of the Dutch Republic, occupied the English, Scottish, and Irish thrones with his wife Mary. Gin is one of the broadest categories of spirits, represented by products of various origins, styles, and flavour profiles that all revolve around juniper as a common ingredient. 

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gin

Whiskey/Scotch

 

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Whisky or whiskey[1] is a type of distilled alcoholic beverage made from fermented grain mash. Various grains (which may be malted) are used for different varieties, including barley, corn (maize), rye, and wheat. Whisky is typically aged in wooden casks, generally made of charred white oak.Whisky is a strictly regulated spirit worldwide with many classes and types. The typical unifying characteristics of the different classes and types are the fermentation of grains, distillation, and aging in wooden barrels.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Whisky

Tequila

 

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Tequila (Spanish  [teˈkila] (help·info)) is a regionally specific distilled beverage made from the blue agave plant, primarily in the area surrounding the city of Tequila, 65 km (40 mi) northwest of Guadalajara, and in the highlands (Los Altos) of the central western Mexican state of Jalisco. Aside from differences in region of origin, tequila is a type of mezcal (and the regions of production of the two drinks are overlapping).[1] The distinction in the method of production is that tequila must use only blue agave plants rather than any type of agave.[1] Tequila is commonly served neat in Mexico and as a shot with salt and lime across the rest of the world.The red volcanic soil in the region around the city of Tequila is particularly well suited to the growing of the blue agave, and more than 300 million of the plants are harvested there each year.[2] Agave grows differently depending on the region. Blue agaves grown in the highlands Los Altosregion are larger in size and sweeter in aroma and taste. Agaves harvested in the lowlands, on the other hand, have a more herbaceous fragrance and flavor.[3]Mexican laws state that tequila can only be produced in the state of Jalisco and limited municipalities in the states of Guanajuato, Michoacán, Nayarit, and Tamaulipas.[4] Tequila is recognized as a Mexican designation of origin product in more than 40 countries.[5] It is protected through NAFTA in Canada and the United States,[6] through bilateral agreements with individual countries such as Japan and Israel,[6] and has been a protected designation of origin product in the constituent countries of the European Union since 1997.[6]Tequila is most often made at a 38% alcohol content (76 U.S. proof) for domestic consumption, but can be produced between 31 and 55% alcohol content (62 and 110 U.S. proof). Per U.S law, tequila must contain at least 40% alcohol (80 U.S. proof) to be sold in the United States.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tequila

Bourbon

 

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Bourbon whiskey /bɜːrbən/ is a type of American whiskey: a barrel-aged distilled spirit made primarily from corn. The name is ultimately derived from the French Bourbon dynasty, although it is unclear precisely what inspired the whiskey's name (contenders include Bourbon County in Kentucky and Bourbon Street in New Orleans).[1] Bourbon has been distilled since the 18th century.[2] The use of the term "bourbon" for the whiskey has been traced to the 1820s, and the term began to be used consistently in Kentucky in the 1870s.[1] While bourbon may be made anywhere in the United States, it is strongly associated with the American South, and with Kentucky in particular. As of 2014, the distillers' wholesale market revenue for bourbon sold within the U.S. is about $2.7 billion, and bourbon makes up about two-thirds of the $1.6 billion of U.S. exports of distilled spirits.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bourbon_whiskey